National Seniors Council

  1. The Canada Employment Insurance Commission (CEIC) today made available the Actuarial Report and its summary for the 2022 Employment Insurance (EI) premium rate. The rate is set at $1.58 per $100 of insurable earnings for employees and $2.21 for employers who pay 1.4 times the employee rate, which is unchanged from the 2020 and 2021 premium rate.
  2. The Government of Canada and the Government of Yukon have reached an agreement on an extension to the Canada–Yukon Early Learning and Child Care Agreement.
  3. The Government of Canada and the Government of Nunavut have reached an agreement on an extension to the Canada–Nunavut Early Learning and Child Care Agreement.
  4. The Government of Canada and the Government of New Brunswick have reached an agreement on an extension to the Canada–New Brunswick Early Learning and Child Care Agreement.
  5. The Government of Canada and the Government of Prince Edward Island have reached an agreement on an extension to the Canada–Prince Edward Island Early Learning and Child Care Agreement.
  6. The Government of Canada and the Government of British Columbia have reached an agreement on an extension to the Canada–British Columbia Early Learning and Child Care Agreement.
  7. The Government of Canada and the Government of the Northwest Territories have reached an agreement on an extension to the Canada–Northwest Territories Early Learning and Child Care Agreement.
  8. Skilled tradespeople from across the country have been critical to essential sectors during the COVID-19 pandemic, and their expertise is in high demand. This demand is expected to remain high over the next 10 years, as over 700,000 skilled trades workers are expected to retire between 2019 and 2028, creating an ever-growing need to recruit and train thousands more. The Government is making targeted investments so that key groups facing barriers—such as women, newcomers, Indigenous people, persons with disabilities, and visible minorities including Black and other racialized communities—can better find work in the skilled trades through projects led by unions and their partner organizations.
  9. COVID-19 continues to have a disproportionate impact on vulnerable Canadians, creating a great need for additional supports. Community-based service providers such as charities and non-profit organizations are on the front lines, serving critical social inclusion, well-being and safety needs during the pandemic. This is why the Government of Canada has worked with national intermediary partners—Community Foundations of Canada, Canadian Red Cross and United Way Centraide Canada—to disburse $350 million to community-based organizations since last May. This funding was used to power thousands of projects, train countless volunteers, and support their communities along the way.
  10. The Canadian economy has been greatly affected by the COVID-19 pandemic, and many sectors and Canadians have been disproportionally impacted. In response, the Government of Canada has a broad plan to support hard-hit sectors, help businesses adapt and thrive, and give Canadians the skills they need to find good, quality jobs as our economy recovers.
  11. List of Successful Projects
  12. It has been a challenging year for Canadians. Yet this would have been an even greater challenge without the countless contributions made by volunteers, not-for-profit organizations, social enterprises and businesses across the country to support and strengthen our communities.
  13. Canada’s Minister of Families, Children and Social Development, Ahmed Hussen, and Quebec’s Minister for Health and Social Services, Lionel Carmant, today announced that an additional $48.5 million in federal funding is being made available to communities in Quebec for 2021–2022 under the Reaching Home program to support the homeless-serving sector’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic in Quebec.
  14. Older seniors across Canada face higher financial pressures. As they age, seniors tend to have lower incomes and often face higher health-related expenses, all while they are more likely to be unable to work, have disabilities or be widowed.
  15. The Minister of Employment, Workforce Development and Disability Inclusion, Carla Qualtrough, will announce funding to create employment training opportunities for persons with disabilities.
  16. Everyone deserves an equal and fair chance at success. Social purpose organizations play a fundamental role in helping communities across Canada tackle a range of pressing social issues. However, many need support to expand their capacity and acquire new skills. In the years to come, a strong social purpose sector will be critical in rebuilding the economy in addition to addressing other priorities in our communities, like unemployment, poverty reduction, reconciliation, gender equality and anti-racism.
  17. On International Youth Day, we celebrate youth in Canada and around the world.
  18. In Canada, diversity is our strength. That is why the Government of Canada committed to taking action to address systemic discrimination affecting Black Canadians.
  19. Canada’s economic recovery depends on young people being able to get good, well-paying jobs now and into the future. This is why the Government of Canada continues to make historic investments in young people, to ensure they have the supports and opportunities needed to build long and successful careers.
  20. The Youth Employment and Skills Strategy (YESS) is a Government of Canada initiative delivered in collaboration with 11 federal departments and agencies, including Employment and Social Development Canada (ESDC). Through the YESS, the Government of Canada helps young people, particularly those facing barriers to employment, get the information and gain the skills, work experience and abilities they need to make a successful transition into the labour market. ESDC’s YESS program supports organizations that provide job placements and skills development services to young people, as well as a broad range of supports such as job coaching, mental health support, clothes for job interviews, day care services for parents and subsidized Internet access to help with job searches.
  21. Every child deserves the best possible start in life, and all parents should have the ability to build both a family and career. Yet, too many families across Canada lack access to affordable, inclusive, and high-quality child care. The global COVID-19 pandemic has also made it clear that without access to child care, too many parents—especially women—cannot fully participate in the workforce.
  22. Minister Hussen and Minister Squires to make a major announcement on support for families
  23. Everyone deserves an equal and fair chance at success. Social purpose organizations (SPOs) play a fundamental role in helping communities across Canada tackle a range of pressing social issues. However, many need support to expand their capacity and acquire new skills that would allow them to deliver innovative solutions, address emerging challenges and access new sources of investment.
  24. Everyone deserves an equal and fair chance at success. Social purpose organizations (SPOs) play a fundamental role in helping communities across Canada tackle a range of pressing social issues. However, many need support to expand their capacity and acquire new skills that would allow them to deliver innovative solutions, address emerging challenges and access new sources of investment.
  25. As we continue our pandemic recovery, businesses are once again reopening their doors to Canadians. Already, we are seeing the economy returning to its pre-pandemic levels, and employers on their path to recovery are hiring in increasing numbers. For several years, Quebec has been experiencing workforce recruitment challenges, and even though the pandemic had a significant impact on unemployment in the province, worker shortages remain a problem.
  26. Young people, especially students, were among the hardest hit when the pandemic struck. That is why the Government of Canada continues to make historic investments to ensure that youth have the supports and opportunities they need to build long and successful careers. Since the start of the pandemic, the Government has created over 300,000 youth and student employment opportunities to ensure young Canadians do not become a lost generation.
  27. The Student Work Placement Program supports partnerships between industry and post-secondary education institutions to create quality work-integrated learning opportunities for post-secondary students so that they can develop the work-ready skills that are required to secure meaningful employment upon graduation.
  28. The COVID-19 pandemic has had a tremendous impact on Canada’s youth, with many seeing their summer jobs, internships and graduation plans disappear. To help them during this unprecedented time, the Government of Canada has introduced supports for youth, including more than 300,000 employment opportunities for youth and students, since the beginning of the pandemic.
  29. The Minister of of Agriculture and Agri-Food, Marie-Claude Bibeau, will announce how the Government of Canada will continue to support access to work experience placements for postsecondary students in Quebec.
  30. The Minister of Employment, Workforce Development and Disability Inclusion, Carla Qualtrough; the Canada Employment Insurance Commission’s (CEIC) Commissioner for Workers, Pierre Laliberté; and the CEIC’s Commissioner for Employers, Nancy Healey, issued the statement below today on the launch of consultations on modernizing the Employment Insurance program. The online survey will open on Monday, August 9, 2021, at canada.ca/ei-consultations. The survey is scheduled to run until Friday, October 8, 2021
  31. Government of Canada highlights investments in young Canadians through the Student Work Placement Program
  32. Young people were among the hardest hit when the pandemic struck. That is why the Government of Canada continues to make historic investments to ensure that youth have the supports and opportunities they need to build long and successful careers. With that goal in mind came the creation of over 300,000 youth and student jobs since the start of the pandemic and the Canada Emergency Student Benefit, which provided income support for over 700,000 students last summer.
  33. hild care is not a luxury, it’s a necessity. Yet too many families in Canada lack access to affordable, inclusive and high-quality child care. This is an economic issue as much as it is a social one. Without access to child care, parents—especially women—cannot fully participate in the economy and the global COVID-19 pandemic has brought these issues to the forefront.
  34. In Canada, diversity is our strength; that is why the Government of Canada is investing in initiatives that recognize the contributions of Black Canadians, and acknowledge the significant and unique challenges faced by their communities.
  35. The Honourable Ahmed Hussen, Minister of Families, Children and Social Development, will announce how the Government of Canada is supporting Black-led organisations. He will be accompanied by Marci Ien, Member of Parliament for Toronto Centre.
  36. The Minister of Employment, Workforce Development and Disability Inclusion, Carla Qualtrough, will meet with young people from Boys and Girls Clubs Canada to discuss Canada Summer Jobs opportunities for youth across Canada.
  37. Skilled tradespeople from across the country have been critical to essential sectors during the COVID-19 pandemic and their expertise is in high demand. This demand is expected to remain high over the next 10 years, as over 700,000 skilled trades workers are expected to retire between 2019 and 2028, creating an ever growing need to recruit and train thousands of skilled trades people. As part of the Canadian Apprenticeship Strategy, the Government is making targeted investments to remove barriers and get more Canadians the hands-on experience and apprenticeship training they need to build good, well-paying careers in the skilled trades.
  38. The Minister of Employment, Workforce Development and Disability Inclusion, Carla Qualtrough, will announce the launch of two calls for proposals to support apprentices build their careers in the skilled trades.
  39. For the past five years, the Canada Child Benefit (CCB) has helped lift 435,000 children out of poverty by providing approximately $25 billion each year in tax-free support to about 3.5 million families. The global COVID-19 pandemic has added a wide range of unpredictable expenses for Canadian families. That’s why the Government of Canada has taken action, through the CCB Young Child Supplement, to help parents cope with the pressures of the pandemic, make life more affordable for families, and grow the middle class.
  40. Young people have been among the hardest hit throughout the pandemic – experiencing more job losses than any other age demographic. Since the beginning of the pandemic, the Government has moved swiftly to implement a number of measures to ensure students and recent grads have access to the financial assistance they need to help support their post-secondary education. These measures included the historic Canada Emergency Student Benefit, which provided income support to over 700,000 students last summer and the creation of over 300,000 youth and student employment opportunities since the start of the pandemic.
  41. The Honourable Ahmed Hussen, Minister of Families, Children and Social Development, will announce how the Government of Canada will give additional support to families with young children.
  42. To help maintain a strong workforce and better position our country for a prosperous economic recovery, the Government of Canada is investing in the skilled trades to ensure that Canadians have the training they need to access good, well-paying jobs. The Government is making targeted investments, so that key groups facing barriers—such as women, newcomers, Indigenous people, persons with disabilities, and Black and racialized Canadians—can better find work in the skilled trades through projects led by unions and their partner organizations.
  43. The Minister of Employment, Workforce Development and Disability Inclusion, Carla Qualtrough, will announce how the Government of Canada will continue to support access to post-secondary education.
  44. Filomena Tassi, Minister of Labour, will announce funding that will help certify skilled tradespeople and prepare them to fill available jobs across Canada.
  45. The Honourable Marc Garneau, Minister of Foreign Affairs and Stéphane Lauzon, Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Seniors, will host a virtual town hall on issues affecting Canadian seniors.
  46. The COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted the need for further action by the Government of Canada and its partners to improve the protection of temporary foreign workers. Year after year, these workers come to Canada to support our agriculture and agri-food industry and contribute greatly to Canada’s food security. Their hard work and expertise has been instrumental over the years and especially during the pandemic, and they deserve to be safe.
  47. Canada’s economic recovery depends on young people being able to get good, well-paying jobs now and into the future. This is why the Government of Canada continues to make historic investments in young people, to ensure they have the supports and opportunities needed to build long and successful careers.
  48. Federal, Provincial and Territorial Ministers* Responsible for Social Services met virtually today. Participating ministers discussed improving collaboration to support persons with disabilities. Today’s meeting was co-chaired by the federal Minister of Employment, Workforce Development and Disability Inclusion, Carla Qualtrough and the Minister of Social Development for New Brunswick, Bruce Fitch.
  49. The Minister of Labour, Filomena Tassi, will meet virtually with Choices for Youth in St. John’s, Newfoundland and Labrador, to discuss their project funding. She will be joined by the Minister of Natural Resources, Seamus O’Regan, and the Minister Responsible for Labour of Newfoundland and Labrador, Bernard Davis.
  50. Every child deserves the best possible start in life. That is why the Government of Canada introduced the Canada Child Benefit (CCB) five years ago to help give families a fair chance at success. Since then, each year the CCB has provided almost $25 billion in tax-free support to about 3.5 million families. This support has helped lift nearly 435,000 children out of poverty, grown the middle class, and put more money in the pockets of 9 out of 10 Canadian families compared to the previous suite of child benefits.