Immigration & Citizenship

  1. A person’s name is fundamental to who they are. Indigenous names are endowed with deep cultural meaning, and speak to Indigenous peoples’ presence on this land since time immemorial. Yet the impact of colonialism means that many Indigenous people’s names have not been recognized.
  2. Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) has launched a process for Indigenous peoples, residential school survivors and their families to reclaim their Indigenous names on replacement passports, travel documents, citizenship certificates and permanent resident cards free of charge until May 30, 2026.
  3. The ties that bind Canada and Hong Kong run deep. The first Hong Kongers arrived here over 150 years ago, and in the years since, Hong Kongers have made incredible contributions to this country.
  4. Today, the Honourable Marco E. L. Mendicino, Minister of Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship, spoke with U.S. Secretary of Homeland Security Alejandro Mayorkas.
  5. Openness, transparency and accountability are guiding principles of the Government of Canada. Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) is incorporating these principles as we improve and modernize our systems, processes and digital infrastructure to better serve our clients. IRCC takes its responsibilities and obligations under the Access to Information Act and Privacy Act very seriously.
  6. The Honourable Marco E. L. Mendicino, P.C., M.P., Minister of Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship, today issued the following statement to mark Citizenship Week:
  7. Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) has put in place a new public policy facilitating permanent residence application for in-Canada families of victims of air disasters involving Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302 (ET302) and Ukraine International Airlines Flight 752 (PS752). The public policy came into effect on May 12, 2021, and will remain in place until May 11, 2022.
  8. Air disasters have taken the lives of too many Canadians and left too many families across our country without loved ones.
  9. The pandemic has disproportionately affected low-wage workers, young people, women and racialized Canadians. Last month, our government released a plan to support them in Budget 2021: A Recovery Plan for Jobs, Growth, and Resilience. This plan will ensure a robust economic recovery that is inclusive of all Canadians and that finishes the fight against COVID-19.
  10. Last month, the Honourable Marco E. L. Mendicino, Minister of Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship, announced an innovative pathway to permanent residence for over 90,000 essential workers and international graduates of a Canadian institution who are actively contributing to Canada’s economy.
  11. The Honourable Marco E. L. Mendicino, Minister of Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship, today issued the following statement to mark Asian Heritage Month
  12. The Honourable Marco E.L. Mendicino, Minister of Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship and the Honourable Bill Blair, Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness, today issued the following statement.
  13. Federal government support of more than $125,000 will help farmers bridge labour gaps within agriculture sector
  14. Caregivers from abroad play an important role in supporting Canadian families who are unable to find the care they need for a family member in Canada. The global COVID-19 pandemic has caused great disruption to life in Canada and around the world, including to application processing at Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC). We recognize that many caregivers working in Canada are waiting anxiously to be reunited with their loved ones, and they need their applications to be processed for that to happen.
  15. Today, the Honourable Marco E. L. Mendicino, Minister of Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship, announced an innovative pathway to permanent residence for over 90,000 essential workers and international graduates who are actively contributing to Canada’s economy.
  16. Over the past few years, the Government of Canada has kept its commitment to help Yazidi refugees and other survivors of Daesh start new lives in this country. Over 1,400 have settled in Canada since 2017, escaping unimaginable horrors at the hands of Daesh. Yet many of these refugees had to leave family members behind.